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HP Pavilion dv3510nr Entertainment Notebook PC support

Understanding Throughput on the 1GB Ethernet

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Limitations affecting throughput on PCs shipped with 1GB Ethernet as the standard.

When accessing the network performance, keep in mind that there is a difference between the theoretical speed rating and that of the real world. The difference may be relatively small, but significant, if you have a well set up network. Otherwise, the difference can be extremely large.
As 1GB Ethernet becomes the standard shipped on HP Notebook PCs, however obtaining this throughput is not practical. A throughput of 300 mbs is more likely the maximum obtainable due to hard drive limitations, TCP/IP overhead, and other limiting factors. However, the migration to this standard allows HP to be able to handle future capabilities.
The theoretical rated speed of a network is never achieved in practice, for a number of reasons. Overhead issues mean that not all of the possible capacity of a network can be used for data. External factors such as hardware bandwidth limitations restrict data input and output. Configuration problems can also greatly reduce real-world performance. Finally, it is important to remember that many technologies are asymmetric, offering higher speed in one direction than the other, and the larger number is often the one that is advertised.
Every network has some degree of normal network overhead, which guarantees that you will never be able to use all of the bandwidth of any connection for data. As an example, a 1GB Ethernet line may be able to transmit 1GB every second, but not all of those bits are data. Some are used to package and address the data—data can't just be thrown onto the network in raw form. Also, many of those bits are used for general overhead activities such as dealing with collisions on transmissions. There are natural inefficiencies in any networking technology. There are also other overhead issues and any network transaction involves a number of different hardware and software layers. Overhead exists at each of them, from the application and operating system down to the hardware.

Normal network overhead

Every network has some degree of normal network overhead, which guarantees that you will never be able to use all of the bandwidth of any connection for data. As an example, a 1GB Ethernet line may be able to transmit 1GB every second, but not all of those bits are data. Some are used to package and address the data—data can't just be thrown onto the network in raw form. Also, many of those bits are used for general overhead activities such as dealing with collisions on transmissions. There are natural inefficiencies in any networking technology. There are also other overhead issues and any network transaction involves a number of different hardware and software layers. Overhead exists at each of them, from the application and operating system down to the hardware.

External performance limiters

There are external factors that limit the performance of a network. Important issues here include the ability of the hardware to process the data, and also any bandwidth limitations that exist in the chain of data transmission between two nodes. Hardware issues most often show up with very fast networking technologies. Consider a Gigabit (1000 Mbps) Ethernet connection between two regular PCs. Theoretically, this connection should allow the transmission of 1 gigabit of data every second. However, in practice, the connection can probably achieve no where near that speed.
An older PC's hard disk probably can't even stream data fast enough to keep a 100 Mbit/s Ethernet connection busy. Bandwidth limitations cause network throughput issues because the entire network can only run as fast as its slowest link. This creates reduced performance. As a common example, suppose you have a cable modem connection to the Internet that is rated at 1 Mbps for downloads. It may be very fast most of the time, but if the Web site you are accessing is totally bogged down, or it is having connectivity problems itself, you are not going to download from that site at 1Mbps. In fact, probably not even close.

Network configuration problems

This refers to network slowdowns that occur because hardware or software has not been set up correctly. Poor cabling, incorrectly configured interface cards, or bad drivers can seriously reduce the performance of a network. Most of these problems can usually be corrected, but only if you are looking for them. Driver problems are particularly troublesome because the natural tendency is for people to blame hardware when slowdowns occur. However, you cannot get the most of your hardware devices without proper software to run it. These issues are much more significant with today's newer hardware than with more established products, incidentally.
Also included in this category of issues are problems that occur due to poor design. These issues can be avoided or reduced by reconfiguring the network or by designing it properly in the first place. Also bear in mind that many networking technologies, especially ones used for Internet access, are asymmetric, meaning that they offer much higher bandwidth in one direction than the other. Usually, this is arranged so that more bandwidth goes down to the computer than from the computer to the network, since most Internet consumers download far more than they upload. However, it's always important to find out if a speed rating is for both directions, or for only one direction, and if so, what the other direction's speed is.
HP Pavilion dv3510nr Entertainment Notebook PC

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